Estonian version

Training program for people (re)starting strength training.
version 1.2

This program will help you:

  • get stronger
  • with proper nutrition, look better (change body composition, build muscle and/or burn fat)
  • upgrade performance
  • decrease injury risk
  • safely and reasonably enter the strength/muscle training world

Suitable for young and old, men and women.

Training A

Exercise 1

Exercise category – Vertical pulls

3-5 sets x 10-12 repetitions  (check the instructions for more specific guidelines for how many sets and reps to do)

Alternatives

Band chinups

Eccentric chinups

Chinups

Machine no 15 in MyFitness

Exercise 2

Squat

3-5 x 10-12

Exercise 3

Vertical press

3-5 x 10-12

Alternatives

Standing dumbbell press

Barbell press

Machine no 11 in MyFitness

Exercise 4

Hip dominant

3-5 x 10-12

Exercise 5

Anti-extension (Abs)

1-2 x 20-30 sec

Exercise 6

Anti-lateral flexion (Obliques)

1-2 x 20-30 sec

Training B

Exercise 1

Horizontal push

3-5 x 10-12

Exercise 2

Lifting / hip-dominant

3-5 x 10-12

Exercise 3

Horizontal pulls

3-5 x 10-12

Exercise 4

“Single leg”

2-4 x 10-12

Exercise 5

Anti-rotation (Obliques 2)

1-2 x 20-30 sec

Exercise 6

Anti-flexion (Back)

1-2 x 20-30 sec

Instructions

The program consists of two different training days, which you should alternate (A, B, A, B, A etc).

It’s recommended to use the program for 2-3 times per week.

Start with the rep range of (8)10-12. From there you can lower the rep range naturally and gradually with the increasing of weights, to about 5 reps in a set in the end.

If you’re training twice a week, do 3-5 sets per exercise. If you’re training three times a week, do 3-5 sets per exercise.

The rating of perceived effort (RPE) should generally be 8-9 of 10. That means that at the end of the set you could still do 1-2 reps with good technique. In the beginning the RPE can be even lower (5-7) and probably actually is anyway, since as a beginner you might not assess you abilities too accurately yet. There is no need to go to failure (10 out of 10 RPE).

The rest duration between sets should be about 1,5+ min. In the beginning (when the loads are lower and there is not that much fatigue) it can be less (for example 60 sec), just make sure the quality of the work doesn’t suffer from lack of rest.

Generally try to increase the weights pretty often. In the beginning and depending on the exercise (potentially larger increases on the lower body exercises) you can go with bigger steps (-5 kg), but later you’d want to probably increase the load minimally (1-2,5 kg).
Example – one workout you do 12 reps with x kg and in the next one you do x+2,5 kg for 10-12 reps.

Another option of progressing is adding reps. Especially with exercises which plateau quicker, where you couldn’t increase the weight any more using the same rep number (for example certain upper body exercises).
Example – one workout you do 10 reps with x kg weight and in the next you do 11 or 12 with the same weight.

Since the primary goal is to get stronger then you’d want to mostly prefer increasing weights to increasing reps.
Combining both progression options is also good, while still leaning more towards increasing weights.
Different exercises can also have different progression models.

There is no predetermined length for the program. Basically you can continue with it until you have reached 5 reps (with a corresponding heavier weight) on most of the exercises and can not increase loads linearly any longer.